For Immediate Release: March 24, 2017
Contacts: Office of the Governor, Heather Fluit, Heather.Fluit@governor.virginia.gov

Governor McAuliffe Vetoes Bills That Would Put Virginians at Risk

 

Governor Terry McAuliffe today vetoed five pieces of legislation that would further weaken the Commonwealth’s gun safety laws and put Virginians at risk. The Governor’s full veto statements are below:

House Bill 1852

 

March 24, 2017


Pursuant to Article V, Section 6, of the Constitution of Virginia, I veto House Bill 1852, which would provide that for a period of 45 days after the issuance of a protective order the individual seeking the protective order may lawfully carry a concealed weapon. This bill would eliminate the application and training requirements associated with concealed handgun permits and allow petitioners to carry a concealed weapon immediately upon the issuance of any protective order. It is identical to House Bill 766/Senate Bill 626 (2016), which I vetoed.

The bill perpetuates the dangerous fiction that the victims of domestic violence will be safer by arming themselves. It would inject firearms into a volatile domestic violence situation, making that situation less safe, not more.

In 2014, there were 112 family and intimate-partner related homicides in Virginia. Sixty-six of those deaths were with a firearm. I will not allow this bill to become law when too many Virginia women have already fallen victim to firearms violence at the hands of their intimate partner. 

Accordingly, I veto this bill.


Sincerely,

Terence R. McAuliffe

 

House Bill 1853

 

March 24, 2017


Pursuant to Article V, Section 6, of the Constitution of Virginia, I veto House Bill 1853, which requires courts to provide petitioners of certain protective orders with a list of firearms safety or training courses or classes. The bill directs the Department of Criminal Justice Services to approve these training courses and classes, and to publish and disseminate a list of providers. 

This bill promotes the theory that the answer to domestic violence is the threat of greater, more lethal violence. Encouraging victims to arm themselves contradicts research which suggests that such a policy is more likely to result in tragedy than to prevent it. Facilitating the introduction of firearms into a volatile situation of domestic violence makes Virginia less safe, not more.

Accordingly, I veto this bill.


Sincerely,

Terence R. McAuliffe

 


Senate Bill 1299

 

March 24, 2017


Pursuant to Article V, Section 6, of the Constitution of Virginia, I veto Senate Bill 1299, which would provide that for a period of 45 days after the issuance of a protective order the individual seeking the protective order may lawfully carry a concealed weapon. This bill would eliminate the application and training requirements associated with concealed handgun permits and allow petitioners to carry a concealed weapon immediately upon the issuance of any protective order. It is identical to House Bill 766/Senate Bill 626 (2016), which I vetoed.

The bill perpetuates the dangerous fiction that the victims of domestic violence will be safer by arming themselves. It would inject firearms into a volatile domestic violence situation, making that situation less safe, not more.

In 2014, there were 112 family and intimate-partner related homicides in Virginia. Sixty-six of those deaths were with a firearm. I will not allow this bill to become law when too many Virginia women have already fallen victim to firearms violence at the hands of their intimate partner. 

Accordingly, I veto this bill.


Sincerely,

Terence R. McAuliffe

 

Senate Bill 1300

 

March 24, 2017


Pursuant to Article V, Section 6, of the Constitution of Virginia, I veto Senate Bill 1300, which requires courts to provide petitioners of certain protective orders with a list of firearms safety or training courses or classes. The bill directs the Department of Criminal Justice Services to approve these training courses and classes, and to publish and disseminate a list of providers. 

This bill promotes the theory that the answer to domestic violence is the threat of greater, more lethal violence. Encouraging victims to arm themselves contradicts research which suggests that such a policy is more likely to result in tragedy than to prevent it. Facilitating the introduction of firearms into a volatile situation of domestic violence makes Virginia less safe, not more.

Accordingly, I veto this bill.

 

Sincerely,

Terence R. McAuliffe

 

Senate Bill 1362

 

March 24, 2017


Pursuant to Article V, Section 6, of the Constitution of Virginia, I veto Senate Bill 1362. This bill would allow any member of the Virginia National Guard, Armed Forces of the United States, or the United States Armed Forces Reserve to carry a concealed handgun in a nonduty status, provided he is carrying his military identification card.

All of us are grateful to the brave young men and women who serve the Commonwealth and the Nation in uniform. However, that service does not automatically qualify them for the responsibilities involved in carrying a concealed handgun, any more than it automatically qualifies them for a driver’s license.

The bill, which would apply both to Virginia residents and non-residents, constitutes an unwarranted expansion of persons allowed to carry concealed handguns that is unnecessary to protect the citizens of the Commonwealth. The bill would create a separate class of individuals who do not require a concealed handgun permit.

Accordingly, I veto this bill.


Sincerely,

Terence R. McAuliffe

 

###